Do I Need To Wrap My Ribs In Foil?

Is it better to wrap ribs in foil?

Wrapping the meat in foil will limit the amount of smoke on the surface of the meat thus yielding a better color and flavor on the final product.

It also adds moisture and speeds up cooking time.

Wrapping should be done about half way through the cooking process or when internal meat temp is 150-160 degrees..

Is it better to wrap ribs in foil or butcher paper?

The foil wrapped ribs have a slightly better bark relative to the butcher paper. The other thing is how the ribs stick out on the foil versus peach butcher paper. We think the foil was wrapper tighter creating more of a braise, causing the meat to pull back a little bit further.

Should I wrap ribs?

While not all pitmasters wrap their meat in the final stages of a cook—in barbecue circles, wrapping in foil is known as the “Texas crutch”—wrapping is an effective way of finishing a long cook without drying out the meat and works for everything from pork shoulder to smoked ribs and beef brisket.

What temp do I cook ribs on?

The accepted finished temperature of pork is 145°F, however, this has not given the collagen inside your ribs time to become gelatin for that perfect bite. That begins to happen when temperatures inside the meat reach 165°F. Continue cooking ribs until they reach around 195°F to 203°F for maximum render.

Do you flip ribs when cooking?

Don’t flip your meat! Smoking low and slow is an indirect cooking method, meaning the heat source is not a direct flame. Much like an oven, both sides should be cooked evenly. Flipping your meat means you’re opening up your grill or smoker and that is generally not advised.